Physical Education

Freshman students will take one semester of Physical Education and one semester of Health Education.  All other students are required to take a full year of Physical Education each year except those who bring an excuse from a physician.  It is the purpose of the Physical Education staff to provide the students with a program that is well-rounded, comprehensive and meaningful.  The program should acquaint students with skills to promote his/her physical fitness and leisure time activities.  The philosophy of this program is to ensure participation in the varying activities in order to develop interest and fulfill the objectives.  Physical Education is an important aspect of general education as it can develop the physical, social and mental well-being of the student.  Students will be graded on participation, fitness, and written knowledge.

Announcements

Archery in the Schools Program
Practices will begin on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 7:30 am – 8:00 am in the North Gym for any student wishing to participate in the Archery in the Schools Program.  No prior experience is needed.  Practices will continue every Thursday and Tuesday mornings until March 21 if there is enough interest.  Please see Mrs. Bartman or Mrs. Hayes if you have any questions.  Our goal is to take as many students to Springfield on Saturday, March 23 for the 7th Annual Archery in the Schools State Tournament Shoot.  Students do not have to be present at every practice session but need to come as much as possible to improve your shooting skills.

 

Department Courses

9 week – 0.25 credit; Freshman/Sophomore; Required Class
In compliance with State Board of Education rules and regulations, driver education is open to freshmen and sophomores (depending on age) and students who have passed a minimum of 8 classes in the two preceding semesters prior to enrollment.  Driving is a privilege, and sixteen year olds must earn that privilege by taking and passing 30 hours of classroom instruction and 6 hours of behind-the-wheel instruction.  The driver education material and instruction is based on the concept of helping young people save lives.  Five basic concepts are taught within the 9 week course:
     1.  The driver and his ability to use judgment and reasoning to effectively react and drive defensively in varied driving               situations.
     2.  Factors other than the driver:  car, roadway, weather.
     3.  Fundamental driving skills and maneuvers.
     4.  Effects of drugs and alcohol and driving.
     5.  Responsibilities for buying, maintaining and insuring a car.
Behind-the-wheel (BTW) driving will be scheduled by the Driver Education teachers rather than Guidance.  Driving will be scheduled before and after school, vacations, summer and limited time during the day.  An additional 0.25 credit awarded upon completion of BTW driving.
Semester – 0.5 credit; Freshman; Required Class
This course involves the study of health as a balancing of physical, mental and social well-being.  A broad spectrum of health-related topics are being discussed, with special concentration on contemporary issues.  Aids, alcohol, drug abuse, tobacco, personal and mental health are among the primary focus.  During the course, students are asked to develop decision-making skills and participate in class discussions.  Information is provided through lectures, audio-visual material and guest speakers.  Students will also be participating in research of current health information which will help them develop and clarify their own personal values.
Semester – 0.25 credit; All Classes; Required Class
Freshman students will take one semester of Physical Education and one semester of Health Education.  All other students are required to take a full year of Physical Education each year except those who bring an excuse from a physician.  It is the purpose of the Physical Education staff to provide the students with a program that is well-rounded, comprehensive and meaningful.  The program should acquaint students with skills to promote his/her physical fitness and leisure time activities.  The philosophy of this program is to ensure participation in the varying activities in order to develop interest and fulfill the objectives.  Physical Education is an important aspect of general education as it can develop the physical, social and mental well-being of the student.  Students will be graded on participation, fitness, and written knowledge.

Department Resource Documents

National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP)

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources is the coordinator of the National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP).  This nationally acclaimed youth archery program implements a curriculum-based archery education program into the public/private school system through the physical education department.  The NASP has been successfully introduced in 40+ states.  Illinois was one of the first 10 states registered in the program.
Designed to teach Olympic-style target archery in the school physical education class, core content covers archery history, safety, technique, equipment, mental concentration and self-improvement.  Students shoot at bulls eye targets placed before an arrow resistant net in their gymnasiium.  Equipment used is state-of-the-art and designed to fit every student.
Currently,  students under the supervision of certified instructor Karla Bartman, have been practicing to get ready for the State Archery Shoot to be held in Springfield, IL on Sat. March 23, 2013 at the Illinois State Fairgrounds ORR Building.

Goals and Standards

Illinois State Learning
Standards and Benchmarks

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH
The following contains the areas of instruction and assessment required for the MTHS Physical Education and Health programs.

GOAL 19: Acquire movement skills and understand concepts needed to engage in health-enhancing physical activity.
A. Demonstrate physical competency in individual and team sports, creative movement and leisure and work-related activities.
     Demonstrate knowledge and skills in a self-selected individual sport, a team sport, creative movement and work-related activities.
B. Analyze various movement concepts and applications.
    Apply the principles of efficient movement to evaluate personal performance.
C. Demonstrate knowledge of rules, safety and strategies during physical activity.
    Select components (e.g., equipment, boundaries, number of players, rules) which promote participation in novel or original physical activities.
    Analyze and apply complex offensive, defensive and cooperative strategies for selected games and sports.
Goal 20: Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness based upon continual self-assessment.
A. Know and apply the principles and components of health-related fitness.
     Implement an individualized health-related fitness plan that includes the principles of training.
B. Assess individual fitness levels.
     Collect and interpret health-related fitness data over a period of time, with and without the use of
     technology.
     Evaluate the effects of fitness choices and heredity on wellness.
C. Set goals based on fitness data and develop, implement and monitor an individual fitness improvement plan.
     Set realistic, long-term, health-related fitness goals based on an individual profile.
     Understand how aging, illness and injury affect physical activity.
     Use profile data to monitor an individual wellness/fitness plan.
Goal 21: Develop team-building skills by working with others through physical activity.
A. Demonstrate individual responsibility during group physical activities.
     Demonstrate individual responsibility through use of various team-building strategies in physical
     activity settings (e.g., etiquette, fair play, self-officiating, coaching, organizing a group activity).
B. Demonstrate cooperative skills during structured group physical activity.
     Demonstrate when to lead and when to be supportive to accomplish group goals.
Goal 22: Understand principles of health promotion and the prevention and treatment of illness and injury.
A. Explain the basic principles of health promotion, illness prevention and safety.
     Explain strategies for managing contagious, chronic and degenerative illnesses (e.g., various treatment and support systems).
     Evaluate the effectiveness of health promotion and illness prevention methods using data from actual situations (e.g., impact of worksite health promotion programs).
     Explain how health and safety problems have been altered by technology, media and medicine (e.g., product testing; control of polio; advanced surgical techniques; improved treatments for cancer, diabetes and heart disease, worksite safety management).
B. Describe and explain the factors that influence health among individuals, groups and
     communities.
     Analyze how public health policies, laws and the media function to prevent and control illness (e.g.,
     product and food labeling, food safety and handling, school immunizations).
C. Explain how the environment can affect health.
     Compare and contrast how individuals, communities and states prevent and correct health-threatening
     environmental problems (e.g., recycling, banning leaf burning, restaurant inspections, OSHA standards
     in the workplace).
Goal 23. Understand human body systems and factors that influence growth and development.
 
A. Describe and explain the structure and functions of the human body systems and how they inter-
     relate.
B. Explain the effects of health-related actions on the body systems.
     Understand the effects of healthy living on individuals and their future generations (e.g., not using
     alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs during pregnancy).
C. Describe factors that affect growth and development.
     Explain how the aging process affects body systems (e.g., vision, hearing, immune system).
Goal 24: Promote and enhance health and well being through the use of effective communication and
     decision-making skills.
 
A. Demonstrate procedures for communicating in positive ways, resolving differences and preventing
     conflict.
     Compare and contrast strategies to prevent conflict and resolve differences.
B. Apply decision-making skills related to the protection and promotion of individual health.
     Explain immediate and long-term impacts of health decisions to the individual, family and community.
C. Demonstrate skills essential to enhancing health and avoiding dangerous situations.
     Evaluate progress toward the attainment of a health goal.
Local Learner Outcomes
As a result of this course, the students will be able to do the following:
1.      Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness through classroom participation.
2.      Develop team-building skills by working with others through physical activity.
3.      Understand principles of health promotion.
4.      Understand the importance of good decision making when it comes to personal health and fitness.
5.      Demonstrate knowledge of the importance of good lifetime fitness goals for healthy bodies.
6.      Find and take an accurate heart rate.
7.      Compute to find target heart rate.
8.      Perform aerobic exercises and sustain a 10-20 minute low-impact workout.
9.      Lift weights with the understanding of sets of repetitions as a conditioning program.
10. Display proper discipline and hygiene in wearing proper attire while exercising.
11. Show good sportsmanship whether winning or losing.
12. Display good team spirit, effort, and cooperative play.
13. Demonstrate a respect for the good or poor skill level of others.
14. Display a responsible attitude towards care and use of equipment as well as helping set up equipment for class.
Ryan, Pat

Department Director
pryan@mths.us

Grieves, Danny
Morrow, Brianna

Faculty
bmorrow@mths.us