Goals And Standards

100 – English I

 

State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
B.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
C.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.
State Goal #2 is for all students to read and understand literature representative of
various societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning.
B.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works.
State Goal #3 is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and
audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
B.     Speak effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and
communicate information.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer
questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a
variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able
to develop topics in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the central idea main topic of a straightforward piece of writing. 
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
organize information in a unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Add a sentence that introduces a simple paragraph (topic sentence).
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able
to observe  the conventions of usage
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Ensure that a verb agrees with its subject when there is some text between the two.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able
to observe the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use commas to set of simple parenthetical phrases.(appositives, interjections, etc.).
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in
uncomplicated literary narratives.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be
able to locate and understand supporting details.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able
to identify and understand sequential, comparative & cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Order simple sequences of events in uncomplicated literary narratives
B.     Identify clear relationships between people, ideas, and so on in
uncomplicated passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
make generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A. Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in un-   complicated passages
B. Draw simple generalizations and conclusions using details that support the
    main points of more challenging passages
 LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic.
To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing
assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a
love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·                    Read a variety of texts, decipher some words in context, discuss the
relationship between ideas presented, and draw conclusions or make generalizations that can be backed up with details from the text
·                    Write for a variety of prompts or audiences, using good grammar; outlines
will be used for paragraph and essay work, with an emphasis on sentences
and paragraphs.
·                    Identify a variety of literary techniques used in texts, and be able to
interpret these texts in the classroom; put events into sequence, identify character relationships, and explain cause-effect relationships.
·                    Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and make a
presentation to the class as required.
·                    Do basic research on a topic, locating information, taking notes, then
producing a paragraph, paper or presentation based on that information
·                    Write a simple introduction, a well-developed paragraph, and use proofreading
to improve their writing.

·                    Present a power point presentation sometime during the year, and use the internet to evaluate various web sites.

 


101 – Honors English I
State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
     A.     Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections
B.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency
C.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials
State Goal #2 is for all students to read and understand literature representative of various
societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning
B.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works
State Goal #3 is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and structure
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations
B.     Speak effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer
questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to develop
topics in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the central idea main topic of a straightforward piece of writing.
B.     Determine relevancy when presented with a variety of sentence-level details.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to organize information in a unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use conjunctive adverbs or phrases to express straightforward logical relation-
ships (e.g., first, afterward, in response).
B.     Add a sentence that introduces a simple paragraph (topic sentence).
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
wise word choice [diction] in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
            A. Determine the clearest and most logical conjunction to link clauses.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of usage.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Ensure that a verb agrees with its subject when there is some text between the   two.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use commas to set of simple parenthetical phrases (e.g., appositives, inter-jections, etc.).
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in uncomplicated literary narratives
B.     Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g.,
point of view, kinds of evidence used) in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in uncomplicated passages
     B.     Make simple inferences about how details are used in passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
identify and understand sequential, comparative & cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Order simple sequences of events in uncomplicated literary narratives
B.     Identify clear relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated
passages.
C.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
determine the meaning of words.
As a result of their English I class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and
Non figurative words, phrases, and statements in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions.
A.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in un-
complicated passages
B.     Draw simple generalizations and conclusions using details that support the
main points of more challenging passages

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:

 

Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic.
To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Read a variety of texts, decipher words in context, discuss the
    relationship between ideas presented, and draw conclusions or make
    generalizations that can be backed up with details from the text
·        Write for a variety of prompts or audiences, using good grammar; outlines
will be used for paragraph and essay work, with an emphasis on sentences, paragraphs, and simple introductions/conclusions.
·        Identify a variety of literary techniques used in texts, and be able to interpret
these texts in the classroom; put events into sequence, identify character relationships, and explain cause-effect relationships.
·        Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required.
·        Do basic research on a topic, locating information, taking notes, then
producing a paragraph, paper or presentation based on that information
·        Identify theses, write a simple introduction and conclusion, and use
proofreading to improve their writing.
·        Handle grammatical problems with growing ease.
·        Present a power point presentation sometime during the year, work on
creating a web site, and use the internet to evaluate various web sites.


 

102 – ENGLISH II – WRITTEN COMPOSITION

State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:

     A.     Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.

B.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.

     C.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.
State Goal #3 is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and
audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
     A.     Locate, organize and use information from various sources to answer
questions, solve problems, and communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a
variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the central idea main topic of a straightforward piece of writing
B.     Determine relevancy when presented with a variety of sentence level details
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
organize information in a unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use conjunctive adverbs or phrases to express straightforward logical relation-
ships (e.g., first, afterward, in response)
B.     Decide the most logical place to add a sentence in an essay
C.     Add a sentence that introduces a simple paragraph
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able
to make wise word choice [diction] in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Delete redundant material when information is repeated in different
parts of speech (e.g., “alarmingly startled”)
B.     Determine the clearest and most logical conjunction to link clauses
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
write and formulate correct sentence structure.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able
to do the following:A.     Recognize and correct marked disturbances of sentence flow and structure (e.g., participial phrase fragments, missing or incorrect relative pronouns, dangling or misplaced modifiers)
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
observe the conventions of usage.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Use idiomatically appropriate prepositions, especially in combination with
verbs (e.g., long for, appeal to)
B.     Ensure that a verb agrees with its subject when there is some text
between the two.
 
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
observe the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Use commas to set off simple parenthetical phrases
B.     Delete unnecessary commas when an incorrect reading of the sentence
suggests a pause that should be punctuated (e.g,, between verb and direct
object clause)
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do
the following:
A.     Infer the main idea or purpose of a straightforward paragraphs in
uncomplicated literary narratives
B.     Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point
Of view, kinds of evidence used) in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
locate and understand supporting details.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Locate important details in uncomplicated passages
B.     Make simple inferences about how details are used in passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able
to identify and understand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Identify clear relationships between people, ideas, and so on in
uncomplicated passages
B.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
determine the meaning of words
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and
nonfigurative words, phrases, and statements in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
make generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to
do the following:
     A.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on
in uncomplicated passages.B.     Draw simple generalizations and conclusions using details that support the
main points of more challenging passages

 

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:

Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic.
To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement, or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.

As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Read texts, deciphering words in context, and be able to draw conclusions or
make generalizations that can be backed up with details from the text.
Students should be able to discuss the relationship between the ideas
presented.
·        Read a variety of texts, and extricate the major points or salient facts that will support (or not support) their thesis.
·        Write for a variety of prompts or audiences, using good grammar; outlines
will be used for all work, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·        Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required.
·        Research topics, locating information, taking notes on note cards, then
producing an essay with footnotes based on that information.
·        Write introductions and conclusions for essays, creating good theses.
·        Proofread to recognize and correct grammatical errors, and to revise structure
and organization of an essay.


103 – ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

State Goal #4
is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of
situations.
As a result of their Oral Communications class, students will be able to do
the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
B.     Speak effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
 
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of their Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the
following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer
questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety
of formats.


ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able
to develop topics in terms of purpose and focus.

As a result of their Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the
following:A.     Identify the central idea main topic of a straightforward piece of writing.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
observe the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their sophomore Oral Communications class, students will be able to
do the following:
A.     Use commas to set off simple parenthetical phrases
B.     Delete unnecessary commas when an incorrect reading of the
sentence suggests a pause that should be punctuated (e.g,, between
verb and direct object clause)
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their sophomore Oral Communications class, students will be able
to do the following:
A.     Infer the main idea or purpose of a straightforward paragraphs
in uncomplicated literary narratives
B.     Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator
(e.g., point Of view, kinds of evidence used) in uncomplicated passages
 
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their sophomore Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in uncomplicated passages
B.     Make simple inferences about how details are used in passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify
and understand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their sophomore Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify clear relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated
passages
B.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
            determine the meaning of words
As a result of their sophomore Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and
nonfigurative words, phrases, and statements in uncomplicated passages
 
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their sophomore Oral Communications class, students will be able to do
the following:
A.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in un-
complicated passages.
B.     Draw simple generalizations and conclusions using details that support the
main points of more challenging passages
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:

Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To
pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a
love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Listen effectively in formal and informal situations, being able to ascertain major points and supporting details.
·        Speak effectively in formal and informal situations, to a variety of audiences, to clearly and succinctly express their point of view on various topics.
·        Research a variety of topics with a variety of sources, and use the information found to present speeches, web pages, presentations, essays, etc., showing a thorough understanding of the topic and the value of the sources used.
·        Make note cards based on researched material, and use them in essays or presentations.
·        Make presentations (power point, web pages, panel discussions, speeches, essays, videos, reports, etc.) that show organization, use good grammar, make effective use of supporting details, etc.
·        Discuss the persuasive techniques used by authors in their articles, books, etc.
·        Handle cause-effect relationships effectively and clearly in writing and speeches
·        Draw conclusions and generalizations based on what they read, and what they think about that research.
·        Be able to understand figurative and non figurative language when they encounter it in their research/readings.
·        Make use of technology to present their ideas in clear, logical fashion.

 


 

104 – HONORS WRITTEN COMPOSITION 

State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
B.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
C.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.

State Goal #3
is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems, and communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources. Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the central idea main topic of a straightforward piece of writing
B.     Determine relevancy when presented with a variety of sentence level details
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to organize
            information in a unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use conjunctive adverbs or phrases to express straightforward logical relation-
ships (e.g., first, afterward, in response)
B.     Decide the most logical place to add a sentence in an essay
C.     Add a sentence that introduces a simple paragraph
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
wise word choice [diction] in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do
the following:
     A.     Delete redundant material when information is repeated in different parts
of speech (e.g., “alarmingly startled”B.     Use the word or phrase most consistent with the style and tone of a fairly straightforward essay
     C.     Determine the clearest and most logical conjunction to link clauses
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to write
and formulate correct sentence structure.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Recognize and correct marked disturbances of sentence flow and structure
(e.g., participial phrase fragments, missing or incorrect relative pronouns, dangling or misplaced modifiers)
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of usage.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use idiomatically appropriate prepositions, especially in combination with
verbs (e.g., long for, appeal to)
B.     Ensure that a verb agrees with its subject when there is some text between the
two.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use commas to set off simple parenthetical phrases
B.     Delete unnecessary commas when an incorrect reading of the sentence suggests a pause that should be punctuated (e.g,, between verb and direct object clause)
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Infer the main idea or purpose of a straightforward paragraphs in uncom-
plicated literary narratives
B.     Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point
Of view, kinds of evidence used) in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in uncomplicated passages
B.     Make simple inferences about how details are used in passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
identify and understand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify clear relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated
passages
B.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
determine the meaning of words
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and
non figurative words, phrases, and statements in uncomplicated passages
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and
non figurative words, phrases, and statements in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
make generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their sophomore Written Composition class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in un-
complicated passages.
B.     Draw simple generalizations and conclusions using details that support the main points  of more challenging passages

 

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:

Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Read texts, deciphering words in context, and be able to draw conclusions or
make generalizations that can be backed up with details from the text.
Students should be able to discuss the relationship between the ideas presented.
·        Read a variety of texts, and extricate the major points or salient facts that will support (or not support) their thesis.
·        Write for a variety of prompts or audiences, using good grammar; outlines will
be used for all work, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·        Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required.
·        Research topics, locating information, taking notes on note cards, then producing
an essay with footnotes based on that information.
·        Write introductions and conclusions for essays, creating good theses.
·        Proofread to recognize and correct grammatical errors, and to revise structure
and organization of an essay.

 



105 – HONORS ORAL COMMUNICATIONS

State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of their Honors Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend sections
B.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency
C.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials

State Goal #4
is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of their Honors Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations
B.     Speak effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience

State Goal #5
is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of their Honors Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer
questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to develop
topics in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their Honors Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the central idea main topic of a straightforward piece of writing
B.     Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used) in uncomplicated passages

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their Honors Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in uncomplicated literary narratives
B.     Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used) in uncomplicated passages

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their Honors Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in uncomplicated passages
B.     Make simple inferences about how details are used in passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify
and understand sequential, comparative & cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their Honors Oral Communications class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Order simple sequences of events in uncomplicated literary narratives
B.     Identify clear relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated
passages.
C.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions.
A.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in un-
complicated passages
B.     Draw simple generalizations and conclusions using details that support the main points of more challenging passages

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:

 

Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Listen effectively in formal and informal situations, being able to ascertain major points and supporting details.
·        Speak effectively in formal and informal situations, to a variety of audiences, including those of good size, to clearly and succinctly express their point of
view on various topics.
·        Research a variety of topics with a variety of sources, and use the information found to present speeches, web pages, presentations, essays, etc., showing a thorough understanding of the topic and the value of the sources used.
·        Make note cards based on researched material, and use them in essays or presentations.
·        Make presentations (power point, web pages, panel discussions, speeches,
essays, videos, reports, etc.) that show organization, use good grammar,
make effective use of supporting details, etc.
·        Discuss the persuasive techniques used by authors in their articles, books, etc., and create a video to imitate the techniques used in the real world.
·        Handle cause-effect relationships effectively and clearly in writing and speeches
·        Draw conclusions and generalizations based on what they read, and what they think about that research.
·        Be able to understand figurative and non figurative language when they encounter it in their research/readings.
·        Make use of technology to present their ideas in clear, logical fashion.



 

106 -HONORS SENIOR ENGLISH I

State Goal #1
states that all students should read with understanding and fluency.

State Goal #3
states that all students should write to communicate for a variety of purposes.

State Goal #5
 states that all students should be able to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of taking Senior English SD and TD, a student should be able to:
·        Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
·        Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
·        Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
·        Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
·        Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
·        Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
·        Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·        Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety f formats.

 

ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to organize
an essay into a united and coherent whole.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to use
diction (word choice) to enhance an essay’s style, tone, clarity and economy.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of usage.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of taking Senior English Self-Directed or Teacher-Directed, students should be
able to:
·        Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence
that sharpens that focus or to determine if an essay has met a specified goal
·        Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of the paragraph
·        Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating
a given statement
·        Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition)
·        Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic
·        Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward
·        Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
·        Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references
·        Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the essay
·        Revise to avoid faulty placement of phrases and faulty coordination and subordination of clauses in sentences with subtle structural problems.
·        Maintain consistent with tense and pronoun person the basis of the preceding
clause or sentence
·        Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences
·        Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently
used verbs and form present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of
·        Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases
·        Recognize and delete unnecessary commas based on a careful reading of a complicated sentence (e.g., between elements of a compound subject or a compound verb joined by and)
·        Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns
·        Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to locate
a text’s main ideas and determine the author’s approach.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to locate
supporting details in a text.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to under-
stand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships in a text.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to
decipher the meaning of words in context.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to
make generalizations and draw conclusions from a variety of texts.
As a result of taking Senior English Self-Directed or Teacher-Directed, students should be
able to:
·        Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages
·        Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages
·        Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages
·        Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of
view, kinds of evidence used) in more challenging passages
·        Locate important details in more challenging passages
·        Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages
·        Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support important points in more challenging passages
·        Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages
·        Understand relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages
·        Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more
challenging literary narratives
·        Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
·        Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages
·        Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase,
or statement in uncomplicated passages
·        Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases, and statements in more challenging passages
·        Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary narratives
·        Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Write a variety of essays (definition/argumentative/persuasive) based on novels read in class and other prompts.
·        Write a research paper on a topic of their choice, argumentative or persuasive in format, correctly using Works Cited, Works Consulted, and MLA format of footnoting.
·        Use commentary to explain the material footnoted.
·        Write some kinds of creative writing (form decided by teacher).
·        Create a senior memory album of 12 chapters, illustrating their lives and
intellectual development.
·        Write a researched biography essay and a critical analysis based on having read
two or more novels, plays, short stories or poems by a single author.
·        Create a researched occupational study based on a career the student is
interested in pursuing, including a job shadowing element.
·        Write a précis, fact/opinion paper, cause/effect, and other types of essays based
on time available.



 

107 – HONORS SENIOR ENGLISH II

State Goal #1
states that all students should read with understanding and fluency.

State Goal #3
states that all students should write to communicate for a variety of purposes.

State Goal #5 
states that all students should be able to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of taking Senior English SD and TD, a student should be able to:
·        Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
·        Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
·        Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
·        Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
·        Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
·        Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
·        Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·        Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety f formats.
 
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to organize
an essay into a united and coherent whole.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to use
diction (word choice) to enhance an essay’s style, tone, clarity and economy.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of usage.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of taking Senior English Self-Directed or Teacher-Directed, students should be able to:
·        Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that focus or to determine if an essay has met a specified goal
·        Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of the paragraph
·        Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating a given statement
·        Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition)
·        Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic
·        Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward
·        Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
·        Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references
·        Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the essay
·        Revise to avoid faulty placement of phrases and faulty coordination and subordination of clauses in sentences with subtle structural problems.
·        Maintain consistent with tense and pronoun person the basis of the preceding clause or sentence
·        Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences
·        Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently used verbs and form present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of
·        Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases
·        Recognize and delete unnecessary commas based on a careful reading of a complicated sentence (e.g., between elements of a compound subject or a compound verb joined by and)
·        Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns
·        Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to locate
a text’s main ideas and determine the author’s approach.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to locate
supporting details in a text.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to under-
stand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships in a text.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to
decipher the meaning of words in context.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to
make generalizations and draw conclusions from a variety of texts.
As a result of taking Senior English Self-Directed or Teacher-Directed, students should be able to:
·        Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages
·        Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages
·        Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages
·        Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used) in more challenging passages
·        Locate important details in more challenging passages
·        Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages
·        Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support important points in more challenging passages
·        Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages
·        Understand relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages
·        Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives
·        Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
·        Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages
·        Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in uncomplicated passages
·        Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases, and statements in more challenging passages
·        Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary narratives
·        Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Write a variety of essays (definition/argumentative/persuasive) based on novels read in class and other prompts.
·        Write a research paper on a topic of their choice, argumentative or persuasive in format, correctly using Works Cited, Works Consulted, and MLA format of footnoting.
·        Use commentary to explain the material footnoted.
·        Write some kinds of creative writing (form decided by teacher).
·        Create a senior memory album of 12 chapters, illustrating their lives and intellectual development.
·        Write a researched biography essay and a critical analysis based on having read two or more novels, plays, short stories or poems by a single author.
·        Create a researched occupational study based on a career the student is interested in pursuing, including a job shadowing element.
·        Write a précis, fact/opinion paper, cause/effect, and other types of essays based on time available.



 

108 – HONORS /AP  ENGLISH

 

State Goal #1 states that all students should read with understanding and fluency.
State Goal #2 states that all students should be able to read and understand literature presentative of various societies, eras and ideas.
State Goal #3 states that all students should write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
State Goal #5 states that all students should be able to use the language arts to acquire,
assess and communicate information.
As a result of taking AP Seminar, a student should be able to:
·        Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
·        Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
·        Comprehend a broad range of reading material.
·        Understand­ how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning.
·        Read and interpret a variety of literary works.
·        Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
·        Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
·        Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
·        Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
·        Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·        Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to organize
an essay into a united and coherent whole.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to use
diction (word choice) to enhance an essay’s style, tone, clarity and economy.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of usage.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of taking AP Seminar, students should be able to:
·        Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that focus or to determine if an essay has met a specified goal
·        Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of the paragraph
·        Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating a given statement
·        Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition)
·        Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic
·        Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward
·        Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
·        Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references
·        Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the essay
·        Revise to avoid faulty placement of phrases and faulty coordination and subordination of clauses in sentences with subtle structural problems.
·        Maintain consistent with tense and pronoun person the basis of the preceding clause or sentence
·        Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences
·        Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently used verbs and form present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of
·        Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases
·        Recognize and delete unnecessary commas based on a careful reading of a complicated sentence (e.g., between elements of a compound subject or a compound verb joined by and)
·        Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns
·        Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to locate
a text’s main ideas and determine the author’s approach.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to locate
supporting details in a text.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to under-
stand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships in a text.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to
decipher the meaning of words in context.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to
make generalizations and draw conclusions from a variety of texts.
As a result of taking AP Seminar, students should be able to:
·        Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages
·        Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages
·        Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages
·        Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used) in more challenging passages
·        Locate important details in more challenging passages
·        Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages
·        Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support important points in more challenging passages
·        Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages
·        Understand relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages
·        Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives
·        Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
·        Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages
·        Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in uncomplicated passages
·        Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases, and statements in more challenging passages
·        Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary narratives
·        Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Read a variety of genres and be able to discuss their content and style.
·        Analyze all genres of literature, and be able to write an essay or orally explain how the author uses techniques to accomplish his/her goals.
·        Relate literature read to literature read previously, or to literature of other eras.
·        Write a variety of essays discussing content, rhetoric and style of authors read.
·        Write with assurance and sophistication, using proper grammar, structure and spelling.
·        Create a valedictory video/power point about their high school career and future plans.
·        Understand the fundamentals of rhetoric and how authors apply them to good effect in their writing.
·        Understand basic literary criticism and apply it to literature read.
·        Critically think about, analyze and evaluate authors and texts covered. Students should be able to deconstruct a thesis in an essay, say, and discover the structure and techniques used, then evaluate the ideas and effectiveness of the effort.
·        May earn up to 12 hours college credit (depending on the university) by passing the AP tests in the spring



109 – SENIOR ENGLISH TEACHER-DIRECTED 

State Goal #1 states that all students should read with understanding and fluency.

State Goal #3 states that all students should write to communicate for a variety of purposes.

State Goal #5
states that all students should be able to use the language arts to acquire,
assess and communicate information.
As a result of taking Senior English TD, a student should be able to:
·        Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
·        Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
·        Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
·        Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
·        Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
·        Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems, and communicate ideas.
·        Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·        Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to develop a topic in terms of purpose and focus.

ACT English Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to organize
an essay into a united and coherent whole.

ACT English Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to use
diction (word choice) to enhance an essay’s style, tone, clarity and economy.

ACT English Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of usage.

ACT English Standards for Transition
states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of taking Senior English Teacher-Directed, students should be able to:
·        Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
·        Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of the paragraph.
·        Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating-ting a given statement.
·        Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition)
·        Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward.
·        Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
·        Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references.
·        Revise to avoid faulty placement of phrases and faulty coordination and subordination of clauses in sentences with subtle structural problems.
·        Maintain consistent with tense and pronoun person the basis of the preceding clause or sentence.
·        Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.
·        Identify the correct form of present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of.
·        Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
·        Recognize and delete unnecessary commas based on a careful reading of a complicated sentence (e.g., between elements of a compound subject or a compound verb joined by and).
·        Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
·        Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to locate
a text’s main ideas and determine the author’s approach.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to locate
supporting details in a text.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to decipher
the meaning of words in context.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions from a variety of texts.
As a result of taking Senior English Teacher-Directed, students should be able to:
·        Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages.
·        Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages.
·        Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages.
·        Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used) in more challenging passages.
·        Locate important details in more challenging passages.
·        Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support important points in more challenging passages.
·        Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
·        Understand relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
·        Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives.
·        Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
·        Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of words, phrases, or statements in uncomplicated passages.
·        Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary narratives.
·        Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students should be able to:
·        Write a variety of essays (definition/argumentative/persuasive, etc.) based on novels read in class and other prompts.
·        Write a research paper on a topic of their choice, argumentative or persuasive in format, correctly using the MLA style of footnoting, a Works Cited page, and maybe a Works Consulted page.
·        Use commentary to explain the material footnoted.
·        Create a senior memory album illustrating their lives and intellectual development through informal narrative writing.
·        Write a researched biography essay and a critical analysis based on having read two or more novels, plays, short stories or poems by a single author.

·        Create a researched occupational study based on a career the student is interested in pursuing, including a job-shadowing element.

 


110 – SENIOR ENGLISH SELF-DIRECTED 

State Goal #1 states that all students should read with understanding and fluency.

State Goal #3
states that all students should write to communicate for a variety of purposes.

State Goal #5
states that all students should be able to use the language arts to acquire,  assess and  communicate information.
As a result of taking Senior English SD, a student should be able to:
·  Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend selections.
·  Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
·  Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
·  Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
·  Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
·  Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions,    solve problems, and communicate ideas.
·  Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·  Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of    formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to organize
an essay into a united and coherent whole.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to use
diction (word choice) to enhance an essay’s style, tone, clarity and economy.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of usage.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of taking Senior English Self-Directed, students should be able to:
·  Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence
that sharpens that focus or to
determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
·  Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of the    paragraph.
·  Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating-ting a  given statement.
·  Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between sentences  (e.g., therefore, however, in addition)
·  Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
·  Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward.
·  Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire  sentence.
·  Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references.
·  Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the essay.
·  Revise to avoid faulty placement of phrases and faulty coordination and subordination of clauses in  sentences with subtle structural problems.
·  Maintain consistent with tense and pronoun person the basis of the preceding clause or sentence.
·  Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.
·  Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently used verbs and form present-   perfect verbs by using have rather than of.
·  Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
·  Recognize and delete unnecessary commas based on a careful reading of a complicated sentence   (e.g., between elements of a compound subject or a compound verb joined by and).
·  Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
·  Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to locate
a text’s main ideas and determine the author’s approach.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to locate
supporting details in a text.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to under-
stand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships in a text.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to decipher
the meaning of words in context.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions from a variety of texts.
As a result of taking Senior English Self-Directed, students should be able to:
·   Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in  uncomplicated passages.
·   Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages.
·   Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages.
·   Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used)
in more challenging passages.
·   Locate important details in more challenging passages.
·   Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages.
·   Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support important
points in more challenging passages.
·   Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
·   Understand relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
·   Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives.
·   Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
·   Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages.
·   Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in
uncomplicated passages.
·   Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases, and
statements in more challenging passages.
·   Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary  narratives.
·   Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and and so on in more challenging passages.

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students should be able to:
·   Write a variety of essays (definition/argumentative/persuasive, etc.) based on novels read in class and other  prompts.
·   Write a research paper on a topic of their choice, argumentative or persuasive in format, correctly using the  MLA style of footnoting, a Works Cited page, and maybe a Works Consulted page.
·   Use commentary to explain the material footnoted.
·   Write some kinds of creative writing (form/genre decided by teacher).
·   Create a senior memory album illustrating their lives and intellectual development through informal narrative  writing.
·   Write a researched biography essay and a critical analysis based on having read two or more novels, plays,  short stories or poems by a single author.
·   Create a researched occupational study based on a career the student is interested in pursuing, including a  job-shadowing element.

 


111 – WORLD LITERATURE I-II

State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of having taken their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
B.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.

State Goal #2
is for all students to read and understand literature representative of various societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of having taken their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning.
B.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works.

State Goal #3
is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of having taken their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and
audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of having taken their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
B.     Speak effectively, using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of having taken their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions,  solve problems and  communicate ideas.

B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.

C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.

 

ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that   focus or to determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
B.     Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating a given statement.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to organize
information in a unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.    Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between  sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition).
B.    Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
C.    Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
wise word choice [diction] in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
B.     Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to write
and formulate correct sentence structure.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Maintain consistency with tense and pronoun usage, based on the preceding clause or sentence.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
            the conventions of usage.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.    Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.
B.    Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently used verbs and form   present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
 the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
B.     Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
C.     Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging   passages.
C.     Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.    Locate important details in more challenging passages.
B.    Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages.
C.    Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support    important points in more challenging passage.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify
and understand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Understand the relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives.
D.    Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
E.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
determine the meaning of words.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in  uncomplicated passages.
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases,  and statements in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their World Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so
on in uncomplicated  literary narratives.
B.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·  Read a variety of materials from a variety of time periods, understanding the
influence of the eras on the
content of the texts.
·  Produce a complete research paper, with footnoted text and a bibliography and note   cards.
·  Use technology to present a power point presentation; and use word processors to write one paper.
·  Write a series of complete essays based on each unit, based on reading material or related issues. Outlines will
be required for all essays, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·  Use correct grammar and punctuation, continue to improve proofreading skills, and develop content with the
use of commentary to create collegiate-style writing.
·  Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required.

 


 

112,113 -AMERICAN LITERATURE I-II 
State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of having taken their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
B.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.

State Goal #2
is for all students to read and understand literature representative of various societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of having taken their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:

A.     Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning.

B.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works.


State Goal #3
is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of having taken their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of having taken their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
B.     Speak effectively, using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of having taken their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and  communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able develop a
topic in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that focus or   to determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
B.     Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating
a given statement.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to organize
information in a unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between  sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition).
B.     Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
C.     Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
wise word choice [diction] in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
B.     Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to write
and formulate correct sentence structure.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Maintain consistency with tense and pronoun usage, based on the preceding
clause or sentence.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of usage.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.
B.     Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently
used verbs and form   present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
B.     Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
C.     Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in    uncomplicated passages.
B.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages.
C.     Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in more challenging passages.
B.     Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support important  points in more challenging passage.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify
and understand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Understand the relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives.
D.    Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
E.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
determine the meaning of words.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in  uncomplicated passages.
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases,  and statements in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary  narratives.
B.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·  Read a variety of materials from a variety of time periods, understanding the influence of the eras on the   content of the texts.
·  Produce a complete research paper, with footnoted text and a bibliography and note cards.
·  Use technology to present a power point presentation; and use word processors to write one paper.
·  Write a series of complete essays based on each unit, based on reading material or related issues. Outlines will  be required for all essays, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·  Use correct grammar and punctuation, continue to improve proofreading skills, and develop content with the  use of commentary to create collegiate-style writing.
·  Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required.

 


 

114, 115 – HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE I-II

State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of having taken their Honors American Literature class, students should be able
to do the following:
A.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
B.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.

State Goal #2
is for all students to read and understand literature representative of various societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of having taken their Honors American Literature class, students should be able
to do the following:
A.     Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning.
B.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works.

State Goal #3
is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of having taken their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:

A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.

B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of having taken this Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
B.     Speak effectively, using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of having taken their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and  communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able develop a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that   focus or to determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
B.     Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of a paragraph.
C.     Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating
a given statement.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to organize information in a  unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between   sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition).
B.     Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
C.     Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when   the essay is fairly straightforward.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to make
wise word choice [diction] in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
B.     Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to write
and formulate correct sentence structure.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Maintain consistency with tense and pronoun usage, based on the preceding
clause or sentence.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of usage.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.
B.     Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently used verbs and form  present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to observe the conventions  of punctuation.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
B.     Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
C.     Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons.

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and  the author’s approach.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages.
C.     Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages.
D.    Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used)   in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate and understand supporting  details.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in more challenging passages.
B.     Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout
a passage, support important  points in more challenging passage.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify and understand  sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Understand the relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives.
D.    Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
E.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to determine the meaning of words.
As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in  uncomplicated passages.
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases,   and statements in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make generalizations and  draw conclusions.

As a result of their Honors American Literature class, students should be able to do the following:A.     Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on   complicated literary  narratives.

B.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and
an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·   Read a variety of materials from a wide variety of time periods, understanding the influence of the eras on the content and style of the texts.
·   Produce a complete research paper, with footnoted text and a bibliography and note cards.
·   Use technology to design and maintain a web page that reflects their impressions of the material and eras studied in this course; present a power point presentation; and use word processors to write a paper.
·   Write a series of complete essays based on each unit, based on reading material or related issues; to also write in imitation of the styles and techniques each era contributed to the development of literature. Outlines will be required for all essays, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·   Use correct grammar and punctuation, continue to improve proofreading skills, and develop content with the use of commentary to create a collegiate-style writing.
·   Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required

 


 

116 & 117 ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

State Goal #1 is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of having taken their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.
B.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.
State Goal #2 is for all students to read and understand literature representative of
various societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of having taken their English Literature class, students should be able to do
the following:
A.     Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning.
B.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works.
State Goal #3 is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of having taken their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of having taken their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
B.     Speak effectively, using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of having taken their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and   communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able develop a topic in terms of   purpose and focus.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that focus or    to determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
B.     Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating
a given statement.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to organize information in a  unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between   sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition).
B.     Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
C.     Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
wise word choice [diction] in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
B.     Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to write
and formulate correct sentence structure.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Maintain consistency with tense and pronoun usage, based on the preceding
clause or sentence.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of usage.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.
B.     Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently
used verbs and form  present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
B.     Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
C.     Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages.
C.     Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in more challenging passages.
B.     Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support  important points in more challenging passage.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify
and understand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Understand the relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives.
D.    Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
E.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
determine the meaning of words.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in  uncomplicated passages.
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases, and statements in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary narratives.
B.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Read a variety of materials from a wide variety of time periods, understanding the influence of the eras  on the content and style of the texts.
·        Produce a complete research paper, with footnoted text and a bibliography and note cards.
·        Use technology to present a power point presentation; and use word processors to write a paper.
·        Write a series of complete essays based on each unit, based on reading material or related issues; to   also write in imitation of the styles and techniques each era contributed to the development of    literature. Outlines will be required for all essays, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·        Use correct grammar and punctuation, continue to improve proofreading skills, and develop content with  the use of commentary to create a collegiate-style writing.
·        Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required.

 


118-119   HONORS/AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION


State Goal #1
is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of having taken their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency
B.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.
State Goal #2 is for all students to read and understand literature representative of various societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of having taken their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Understand how literary elements and techniques are used to convey meaning.
B.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works.
State Goal #3 is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of having taken their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of having taken their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
B.     Speak effectively, using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and communicate information.
As a result of having taken their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and  communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able develop a topic in terms of purpose  and focus.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that focus  or to determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
B.     Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of a paragraph.
C.     Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating
a given statement.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to organize information in a unified   and coherent manner.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between   sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition).
B.     Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
C.     Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when   the essay is fairly straightforward.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
wise word choice [diction] in  terms of style, tone, clarity and economy.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
B.     Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to write and formulate correct  sentence structure.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Maintain consistency with tense and pronoun usage, based on the preceding
clause or sentence.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe the conventions of usage.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.
B.     Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently
used verbs and form present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to observe the conventions of  punctuation.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
B.     Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
C.     Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and  the author’s approach.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Infer the main idea or purpose of straightforward paragraphs in more challenging passages.
C.     Summarize basic events and ideas in more challenging passages.
D.    Understand the overall approach taken by an author or narrator (e.g., point of view, kinds of evidence used)  in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to locate and understand supporting  details.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in more challenging passages.
B.     Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout
a passage, support   important points in more challenging passage.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify and understand sequential,  comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Understand the relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives.
D.    Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
E.     Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to determine the meaning of words.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases,   and statements in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their Honors/AP English Literature class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on
in uncomplicated literary narratives.
B.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way
as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading
and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·   Read a variety of materials from a wide variety of time periods, understanding the influence of the eras on the content and style of the texts.
·   Produce a complete research paper, with footnoted text and a bibliography and note cards.
·   Use technology to design and maintain a web page that reflects their impressions of the material and eras   studied in this course; present a power point presentation; and use word processors to write a paper.
·   Write a series of complete essays based on each unit, based on reading material or related issues; to also  write in imitation of the styles and techniques each era contributed to the development of literature. Outlines  will be required for all essays, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·   Use correct grammar and punctuation, continue to improve proofreading skills, and develop content with the  use of commentary to create a collegiate-style writing.
·   Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions, and even make a presentation to the class as required.

 


 

120 – Reading and Writing


State Goal #1
is for all students to read with understanding and fluency.
As a result of having taken their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
          A.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency.

State Goal #2
is for all students to read and understand literature representative of various societies, eras and ideas.
As a result of having taken their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Read and interpret a variety of literary works.
State Goal #3 is for all students to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.
As a result of having taken their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of having taken their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able develop
a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the focus of a simple essay, applying that knowledge to add a sentence that sharpens that focus  or to determine if an essay has met a specified goal.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to organize
information in a unified and coherent manner.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
B.     Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when  the essay is fairly straightforward.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to write
and formulate correct sentence structure.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Maintain consistency with tense and pronoun usage, based on the preceding
clause or sentence.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of usage.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to observe
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
ascertain the main idea and the author’s approach.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Identify a clear main idea or purpose of any paragraph or paragraphs in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Summarize basic events and ideas

ACT Reading Standards for Transition
state that [all] students should be able to locate
and understand supporting details.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Locate important details in more challenging passages.
B.     Locate and interpret minor or subtly stated details in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Discern which details, though they may appear in different sections throughout a passage, support  important points in more challenging passage.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to identify
and understand sequential, comparative and cause-effect relationships.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Understand the relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages.
C.     Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to
determine the meaning of words.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in uncomplicated passages.
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases,  and statements in more challenging passages.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions.
As a result of their Reading and Writing class, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary  narratives.
B.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Read a variety of materials.
·        Produce a complete research paper, with footnoted text and a bibliography and note cards.
·        Write complete essays, based on reading material or related issues. Outlines will be required for all  essays, with an emphasis on sound structure.
·        Use correct grammar and punctuation, continue to improve proofreading skills, and develop content with  the use of commentary to create collegiate-style writing.
·        Listen and take notes during lectures and discussions.

 


 

121, 122  – HUMANITIES I-II

 

State Goal #1 states that all students should be able to read with understanding and fluency.

State Goal #2
states that all students should be able to read and understand literature representative of various  societies, eras and ideas.

State Goal #3
states that all students should be able to write to communicate for a variety of purposes.

State Goal #16
states that all students should be able to understand events, trends, individuals and movements  shaping the history of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.

State Goal #17
states that all students should be able to understand world geography and the effects of geography  on society.

State Goal #18
states that all students should be able to understand social systems, with an emphasis on the United  States.

State Goal #25
states that all students should be able to know the language of the arts.

State Goal #26
states that all students should be able, through creating and performing,
to understand how works  of art are produced. 

State Goal #27
states that all students should be able to understand the role of the arts in civilizations, past and  present.
As a result of taking either Humanities I or II or both, students should be able to do the following:
  1. Comprehend a broad range of reading materials.
  2. Read and interpret a variety of literary works.
  3. Use correct grammar, spell­ing, punctuation, capitalization and structure. Apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation.
  4. Locate, describe and explain places, regions and features on the Earth.
  5. Understand the historical significance of geography.
  6. Compare characteristics of culture as reflected in language, literature, the arts, traditions and institutions.
  7. Understand the roles and interactions of individuals and groups in society.
  8. Understand how social systems form and develop over time.
  9. Understand the sensory elements, organizational principles and expressive qualities of the arts.
  10. Understand the similarities, distinctions and connections in and among the arts.
  11.  Understand processes, traditional tools and modern technologies used in the arts.
  12. Apply skills and knowledge neces­sary to create and perform in one or more of the arts. Analyze how the arts function in history, society and everyday life.
  13. Understand how the arts shape and reflect history, society and everyday life.

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:

Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.

As a result of having taken either Humanities I or II or both, students should be able to do the following:
·        Create projects demonstrating their knowledge and understanding of such arts as architecture.
·        Write papers comparing and contrasting artists, art and historical eras.
·        Be able to define different movements in the arts and enumerate their characteristics, plus be able to   identify a piece of any art as a member of a movement.
·        Be familiar with great pieces of art, literature, music and architecture.
·        Write essays explaining the relevance of art to the cultural and social fabric of society in Rome, Greece, the Medieval Period, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical and Romantic periods.
·        Be able to describe how philosophy impacted the artistic movements of these periods.
·        Be able to relate ancient cultural affectations still prevalent in today’s Western society. 

 


 

126 – CREATIVE WRITING 

State Goal #3 states that all students should be able to write to communicate for a variety

of purposes.
As a result of having taken their Creative Writing class, students should be able to:
A.     Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
B.     Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
C.     Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that all students should be able to write
organized, unified, and coherent texts.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that all students should be able to make
good diction (word) choices in terms of style, tone, clarity, and economy.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that all students should be able to write
using good sentence structure and formation.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that all students should be able to utilize the conventions of usage.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that all students should be able to utilize
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of taking Creative Writing, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections (e.g., therefore, however, in addition)
B.     Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
C.     Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references
D.     Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the text.
E.      Maintain consistent with tense and pronoun person the basis of the preceding clause or sentence
F.      Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences
G.     Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases
H.     Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns
I.        Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that all students should be able to recognize sequential, comparative, and cause-effect relationships.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that all students should be able to draw
conclusions and make generalizations based on their reading and writing.
As a result of having taken Creative Writing, students should be able to do the following:
A.     Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages
B.     Understand relationships between people, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated passages
C.     Identify clear relationships between characters, ideas, and so on in more challenging literary narratives
D.     Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships in uncomplicated passages
E.      Identify clear cause-effect relationships in more challenging passages
F.      Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in uncomplicated literary narratives
G.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES:
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love
of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Write in a variety of genres (essays, short stories, poetry, etc.).
·        Proofread their own and others’ creative works, suggesting improvements in
diction, grammar, structure, and the use of literary techniques.
·        Show creativity in expression of tone, content, and style.
·        Use good grammar and punctuation in presenting their works clearly to their reading audience.
·        Appreciate the great writers’ use of the same stylistic devices and genres they are learning.

 


 

128 – PRINT JOURNALISM
 
State Goal #3 states that all students should be able to write to communicate for a variety
of purposes.

State Goal #4
states that all students should be able to listen and speak effectively in a
variety of situations.

State Goal #5
states that all students should be able to use the language arts to acquire,
assess and communicate information.
As a result of having taken the Print Journalism class, students should be able to:
·        Use correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization and structure.
·        Compose well-organized and coherent writing for specific purposes and audiences.
·        Communicate ideas in writing to accomplish a variety of purposes.
·        Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
·        Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and communicate ideas.
·        Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·        Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of format.s
 
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to develop a topic in terms of purpose and focus.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to organize
an essay (or any written work) into a united and coherent whole.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to organize
an essay into a united and coherent whole.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to use
diction (word choice) to enhance an essay’s style, tone, clarity and economy.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of usage.
ACT English Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to handle
the conventions of punctuation.
As a result of taking Senior English Teacher-Directed, students should be able to:
·        Delete material primarily because it disturbs the flow and development of the paragraph
·        Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating a given statement
·        Determine the need for conjunctive adverbs or phrases to create subtle logical connections between sentences (e.g., therefore, however, in addition)
·        Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic
·        Add a sentence to introduce or conclude the essay or to provide a transition between paragraphs when the essay is fairly straightforward
·        Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
·        Identify and correct ambiguous pronoun references
·        Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the essay.
·        Revise to avoid faulty placement of phrases and faulty coordination and subordination of clauses in sentences with subtle structural problems.
·        Maintain consistent with tense and pronoun person the basis of the preceding clause or sentence
·        Ensure that a pronoun agrees with its antecedent when the two occur in separate clauses or sentences
·        Identify the correct past and past participle forms of irregular and infrequently used verbs and form present-perfect verbs by using have rather than of.
·        Use punctuation to set off complex parenthetical phrases.
·        Recognize and delete unnecessary commas based on a careful reading of a complicated sentence (e.g., between elements of a compound subject or a compound verb joined by and)
·        Use apostrophes to indicate simple possessive nouns
·        Recognize inappropriate uses of colons and semicolons
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to deter-
mine sequential, comparative, and cause-effect relationships.
ACT Reading Standards for Transition states that all students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions from a variety of texts.
As a result of having taken the Print Journalism class, a student should be able to:
·        Order sequences of events in uncomplicated passages/.
·        Understand relationships between people, ideas, and so on.
·        Understand implied or subtly stated cause-effect relationships.
·        Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about ideas and so on.
LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a
way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.

As a result of having taken this class, students should be able to:
·         Understand the terminology that is used in journalism.
·         Write a variety of journalistic articles in various styles.
·         Produce a newspaper for the high school community.
·         Use good grammar and spelling to write these articles.
·         Interview, and carefully listen to and critically interpret what information they
are given.
·         Use some basic technology in producing the newspaper.

 


 

129 – Broadcast Journalism

State Goal #4 states that students should be able to listen and speak effectively in a
variety of situations.

State Goal #5
states that students should be able to use the language arts to acquire, assess, and communicate  information.
As a result of having taken Broadcast Journalism, students should be able to:
·        Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
·        Speak effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
·        Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·        Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of   formats.

ACT English Standards for Transition
state that students should be able to develop a
topic in terms of purpose and focus.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that students should be able to organize
piece of writing into a unified, coherent whole.
As a result of having taken Broadcast Journalism, students should be able to:
·        Delete material because it disturbs the flow and development of the paragraph [written news story].
·        Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating a given statement.
·        Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
·        Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
·        Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the essay.

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES
 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students should be able to:
·         Understand the terminology that is used in broadcast journalism.
·         Write a variety of tele journalistic articles in various styles.
·         Produce a video or newscast using the technology available.
·         Use good grammar and spelling to write news stories, ads, etc.

·         Interview, and carefully listen to and critically interpret what information they are   given.

 


130 – Advanced Broadcast Journalism

State Goal #4 states that students should be able to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.


State Goal #5
states that students should be able to use the language arts to acquire, assess, and communicate  information.

As a result of having taken Broadcast Journalism, students should be able to:

·        Listen effectively in formal and informal situations.
·        Speak effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
·        Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources.
·        Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of   formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that students should be able to develop a
topic in terms of purpose and focus.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that students should be able to organize a
piece of writing into a unified, coherent whole.
As a result of having taken Broadcast Journalism, students should be able to:
·        Delete material because it disturbs the flow and development of the paragraph [written news story].
·        Add a sentence to accomplish a fairly straightforward purpose such as illustrating a given statement.
·        Rearrange the sentences in a fairly uncomplicated paragraph for the sake of logic.
·        Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence.
·        Use the word or phrase most appropriate in terms of the content of the sentence and tone of the essay.

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES

Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass,
a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way
as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading
and an exploration and discussion of ideas.

As a result of having taken this class, students should be able to:

·         Understand the advanced terminology that is used in broadcast journalism.
·         Write a variety of tele journalistic articles in various styles.
·         Produce videos and newscasts using the technology available.
·         Use good grammar and spelling to write news stories, ads, etc.
·         Interview, and carefully listen to and critically interpret what information they
are given.
·         Do other projects as time and opportunity affords.
·         Work effectively, efficiently, independently on projects.



132 – Advanced Public Speakingis for all students to read with understanding and fluency.

State Goal #1

As a result of their Advanced Public Speakings class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Apply word analysis and vocabulary skills to comprehend sections
B.     Apply reading strategies to improve understanding and fluency
C.     Comprehend a broad range of reading materials
State Goal #4 is for all students to listen and speak effectively in a variety of situations.
As a result of their Advanced Public Speakings class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Listen effectively in formal and informal situations
B.     Speak effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience
State Goal #5 is for all students to use the language arts to acquire, assess and commun-
icate information.
As a result of their Advanced Public Speakings class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Locate, organize, and use information from various sources to answer questions, solve problems and  communicate ideas.
B.     Analyze and evaluate information acquired from various sources
C.     Apply acquired information, concepts and ideas to communicate in a variety of formats.
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to develop
topics in terms of purpose and focus.
As a result of their Advanced Public Speakings class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Identify the central idea main topic of a straightforward piece of writing
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to determine the meaning of  words in a passage.
As a result of their Advanced Public Speakings class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of virtually any word, phrase, or statement in   uncomplicated passages
B.     Use context to determine the appropriate meaning of some figurative and non figurative words, phrases, and statements in more challenging passages
ACT English Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make
generalizations and draw conclusions from their reading.
As a result of their Advanced Public Speakings class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Draw subtle generalizations and conclusions about characters, ideas, and so on in an uncomplicated  literary narrative
B.     Draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and so on in more challenging passages
ACT Reading Standards for Transition state that [all] students should be able to make appropriate word choices in terms of style, tone, clarity and economy:
As a result of their Advanced Public Speakings class, students will be able to do the following:
A.     Revise a phrase that is redundant in terms of the meaning and logic of the entire sentence

LOCAL LEARNER OUTCOMES: 
Students will be taught in a positive, safe environment that stresses a work ethic. To pass, a student must demonstrate improvement or mastery of goals by completing assignments. Literature, composition and communications will be presented in such a way as to encourage further exploration on the students’ part. The goal is to not only educate, but also to create lifelong learners. The Department hopes to encourage a love of reading and an exploration and discussion of ideas.
As a result of having taken this class, students will be able to:
·        Listen effectively in formal and informal situations, being able to ascertain major   points and supporting  details.
·        Speak effectively in formal and informal situations, to a variety of audiences, including those of good  size, to clearly and succinctly express their point of view on various topics.
·        Research a variety of topics with a variety of sources, and use the information found to present speeches,  web pages, presentations, essays, etc., showing a thorough understanding of the topic and the value of the  sources used.
·        Make note cards based on researched material, and use them in essays or presentations.
·        Make presentations (power point, web pages, panel discussions, speeches, essays, videos, reports, etc.)  that show organization, use good grammar, make effective use of supporting details, etc.
·        Discuss the persuasive techniques used by authors in their articles, books, etc., and create a video to   imitate the techniques used in the real world.
·        Handle cause-effect relationships effectively and clearly in writing and speeches
·        Draw conclusions and generalizations based on what they read, and what they think about that research.
·        Be able to understand figurative and non figurative language when they encounter it in their  research/readings.
·        Make use of technology to present their ideas in clear, logical fashion.